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Color Work Flow

 

Color Work Flow

Color management at the time of image capture can save a lot of guessing and headaches down the road. One of the most difficult things to remember after a day of, or even one shot is the color of the image subject. One of the thoughts that has remained with me since being a student at Sheridan College was ; 40% of society is color blind in some form. This makes color management critical. Luckily digital photography introduced a lot of innovative solutions.

Macro in the Studio

Macro in the Studio

By definition (according to wiki)
"Macrophotography is close-up photography, usually of very small subjects. Classically a macrophotograph is one in which the size of the subject on the negative is greater than life size. However in modern use it refers to a finished photograph of a subject at greater than life size. The ratio of the subject size on the film plane (or image sensor plane) to the actual subject size is known as the reproduction ratio. Likewise, a macro lens is classically one lens capable of reproduction ratios greater than 1:1, although it now refers to any lens with a large reproduction ratio, despite rarely exceeding 1:1."

On Location or in the Studio

 

On Location or in the Studio?

At what point does it make more sense to shoot in the studio or on site. Over the years I have found myself doing more and more shoots on site, either at the logistics center or manufacturing facility. At what point should you shoot on site versus in the studio? The answer is really dependent on the type of subject be photographed, its value, and quantity of the items.

 

Cosmetics

Cosmetics

One of the areas of product photography I particularly enjoy doing is cosmetics.  This is probably due in most part to the colour range and unique shapes found in the industry. With many perfume manufacturers developing uniquely branded bottles and the gamut of nail polish, lipstick colours it tends to lend itself naturally to being photographed.  I always enjoyed being part of the many Christmas catalogs we used to shoot for the large department stores (Eatons, The Bay, Simpsons and Sears). Even though this is going back in memory to the large format film era the very nature of the subject was a joy to shoot. Maybe part of the attraction was due to being specialized in primarily crystal and silverware. For the most part these were monotone in nature so being handed assignments with lots of color and small set up area, made of a welcome break.